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3 Ways to Plan for Moving Abroad

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For the lucky individual that has been awarded a position overseas or given the opportunity to live and travel abroad, there is a lot of preparation that needs to be done before jumping on the plane. After you have shared your news with everyone you know and heard all their advice, you need to take the following steps to get ready for your life-changing move.

Start Pinching Pennies

Think of the average costs for an in-country or across town move. Now, look at moving all the way around the world. You are going to doing a lot more than just renting a moving van. You will have to factor in international shipping, housing costs, plane tickets, and the fees for a passport or visa application. It is a good idea to have at a minimum, six months of savings available for your moving money. If you aren’t sure about the cost of living where you are going, there are a number of online resources that can provide Italian citizenship assistance and insight.

Get Your Documentation in Order

Before you will be able to apply for a visa, you will need to have a valid passport. In some countries, your passport must be valid for at least six months past your travel date. If your passport expires while you are abroad, it fairly simple to heard to the U.S. Embassy where you are living to have it renewed. After the passport is secured, apply for a visa. You will need to check with the requirements of the country where you are headed, and there is usually supporting documentation that is required to be submitted before approval. Get this done sooner rather than later.

Figure Out Health Care

You will want to check on health care coverage while you are abroad. You can start with your current provider and ask about international policies. You also need to work with your healthcare professional to get copies of your medical records, immunizations, and potential prescription complications. Not all countries will allow your medications, and you may have a hard time filling a medicine somewhere else. The U.S. Embassy where you are headed should have a list of doctors and providers for American citizens. Start your search there.

You need to consider housing, your employment, and potential language barriers, You need to register in the U.S. Embassy’s travel program, and stay up to date on the safety situation of the country where you are headed. Traveling and living abroad isn’t something that you can rush into.

Krystal | Sunny Sweet Days
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